Tom Cruise, meet Matthias Rath

Looks like rogue cardiologist Matthias K. Rath is drawing fire for his efforts to convince South Africans that antiretrovirals make AIDS worse and the only true cure is vitamins. I’m particularly interested in the antics of Dr. Rath, as some friends of mine were the curators of The Matthias K. Rath Museum of Destruction and Resurrection, housed in a single large dorm room. The museum existed for a mere few months before its inevitable Destruction, but that was long enough to generate debate on Wikipedia. The MKRMDR was notable for convincing both traditional and online media to report on a dorm room full of crap, but its namesake is actually a pretty dangerous guy. Vitamin C will not cure AIDS, people. It will not cure depression. It can save your life, but only if you have scurvy.

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One Response to “Tom Cruise, meet Matthias Rath”

  1. Zubin Says:

    So that the Wikipedia article may live on in glory, I will (ab)use my administration privileges to reproduce it in the Annalog. 128.12.71.106 was the primary author, Howcheng, Frazzydee, Shanedidona, and Mailer diablo also made minor edits.

    Just in case a Wikipedian finds me here and thinks I’m dumb, note that I didn’t undelete it, or even request undeletion (:

    “The Matthias Rath Center, located on the third floor of Kairos (301) on the campus of Stanford University is a free adaptation of the 16th century Wunderkammer of Germany, the pre-Enlightenment cabinets of curiosities.

    The Friends of the MKRMDR (FMKRMDR) is a benevolent society of individuals who wish to spread the philosophies of Dr Rath and his Museum, mainly the expansion of wonder into the otherwise quotidian world.

    The Museum was formally opened on 6 October 2004 in honor of Dr. Matthias Rath, European cardiologist, political activist and acclaimed futurologist.

    Current exhibitions feature natural history, anthropology and native textiles. The curators also tend to a rotating collection of Asian art and a small research library. Docent tours by appointment; drop-ins welcome. Open most afternoons, evenings and Ash Wednesdays.”

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